Say you just got back from having a good time with friends partying or what have you, but now you’re sad because you can’t share any of the memorable pictures on Facebook for fear of it getting out and hurting your career.

Maybe you work with the younger generation where the only way to get a timely response is through text, but you need to keep multiple people in the loop.

Or maybe you have regular meetings with a team across the country but want to be able to see them all face to face as you discuss the next month’s plans.

I’ve definitely had my share of these challenges as a professional, but never would have considered using Facebook or Twitter to tackle them.  Facebook is still a big “no-no” in many offices.

That’s why I found it so interesting to see what Google is doing with their attempt into the social networking arena.  Google is basically taking the challenges professionals and others have in their social environments (planning get-togethers, group video chat, sharing interests, keeping posts private from those who don’t need to know)  and addressing them through their Google+ Project.

They are coming into some tough competition, but they seem to be targeting a different market than Facebook.  Where Facebook went guns blazing for the college student, Google is aiming a little higher, toward the professional.  It might not be obvious at first glance, but everything from the voice casting of their videos to the applications of their main features, show social networking isn’t just for the kids anymore.

Circles: Keeping Your Content From The Boss

The fundamental challenge with LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter is that the audiences we choose to share our content with changes based on the social media tool.

For instance, on Twitter I am followed by thousands of strangers for every person I actually know.  Facebook tends to have my acquaintances, family, and friends.  While LinkedIn just has those I know who are working in the professional field.

Google recognizes we have circles in real life, so why don’t we have them on our social networking? We have our family circle, working circle, friends circle, acquaintances circle, and maybe some hobby circles.

What we share on Facebook often isn’t best suited for every group connected to us.  Some professionals have learned the hard way by forgetting the circles that can see our content without our awareness.

So Google made it easy to share just to those it concerns.  Hate your job and want to ask for some help, but don’t want the office gossiper to see?  Do your friend’s eyes glaze over whenever you post an article about bark beetles?  Just share it with your circle of park ranger co workers.

You get the point.

Sparks: Sharing Amazing Content With Those that Care

One of my favorite tools for finding extraordinary content that fits my taste is Stumbleupon.  You select a few interests from a list of categories and Stumbleupon sends you to amazing content that fits your taste.

Sparks is taking this same idea but adding one more step by making it easy to then share the content you find with whatever circles you think it would benefit.

But why should you even care about sharing articles, videos, or pictures?  How can that help you advance as a professional?

We all know that people buy from people they like.  The same can be said of recommendations, referrals, or job offers.  In today’s world, having an active face to face relationship with all of your connections would just be impossible, but by keeping an active presence on social networks where you are consistently finding and sharing amazing content on your interests and expertise will keep your network aware of you and on their mind if something relevant comes their way.

You want your social network to know you as the “social media guru”, “HR expert”, “design master”, etc.  Sparks lets you do it rather simply.

Hangouts: Group Video

One of the challenges I’ve had at work has been online collaboration with our team that is spread between Arizona, Vancouver, and Ontario.  In the past we’ve used Skype to do some face to face video as long as it was just two of us, but now Google is offering the ability to use video chat as a group, with their new Hangouts feature.

If this works as easily as they show it, then I may be moving to a new way to do video calls.

Huddle: Group Texting

Sometimes a person’s preferred way to communicate is text.  However texting becomes difficult if what you need to talk about involves more than the person you are texting with.  What if you want Bob and Sally’s input in the conversation?

That’s what Google’s Huddle feature aims to accomplish.  It’s basically turning your text into an instant messaging device.  You can have a whole group of people in a text where each text is share with the group rather then the individual.

Source

Say you just got back from having a good time with friends partying or what have you, but now you’re sad because you can’t share any of the memorable pictures on Facebook for fear of it getting out and hurting your career.

Maybe you work with the younger generation where the only way to get a timely response is through text, but you need to keep multiple people in the loop.

Or maybe you have regular meetings with a team across the country but want to be able to see them all face to face as you discuss the next month’s plans.

I’ve definitely had my share of these challenges as a professional, but never would have considered using Facebook or Twitter to tackle them.  Facebook is still a big “no-no” in many offices.

That’s why I found it so interesting to see what Google is doing with their attempt into the social networking arena.  Google is basically taking the challenges professionals and others have in their social environments (planning get-togethers, group video chat, sharing interests, keeping posts private from those who don’t need to know)  and addressing them through their Google+ Project.

They are coming into some tough competition, but they seem to be targeting a different market than Facebook.  Where Facebook went guns blazing for the college student, Google is aiming a little higher, toward the professional.  It might not be obvious at first glance, but everything from the voice casting of their videos to the applications of their main features, show social networking isn’t just for the kids anymore.

Circles: Keeping Your Content From The Boss

The fundamental challenge with LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter is that the audiences we choose to share our content with changes based on the social media tool.

For instance, on Twitter I am followed by thousands of strangers for every person I actually know.  Facebook tends to have my acquaintances, family, and friends.  While LinkedIn just has those I know who are working in the professional field.

Google recognizes we have circles in real life, so why don’t we have them on our social networking? We have our family circle, working circle, friends circle, acquaintances circle, and maybe some hobby circles.

What we share on Facebook often isn’t best suited for every group connected to us.  Some professionals have learned the hard way by forgetting the circles that can see our content without our awareness.

So Google made it easy to share just to those it concerns.  Hate your job and want to ask for some help, but don’t want the office gossiper to see?  Do your friend’s eyes glaze over whenever you post an article about bark beetles?  Just share it with your circle of park ranger co workers.

You get the point.

Sparks: Sharing Amazing Content With Those that Care

One of my favorite tools for finding extraordinary content that fits my taste is Stumbleupon.  You select a few interests from a list of categories and Stumbleupon sends you to amazing content that fits your taste.

Sparks is taking this same idea but adding one more step by making it easy to then share the content you find with whatever circles you think it would benefit.

But why should you even care about sharing articles, videos, or pictures?  How can that help you advance as a professional?

We all know that people buy from people they like.  The same can be said of recommendations, referrals, or job offers.  In today’s world, having an active face to face relationship with all of your connections would just be impossible, but by keeping an active presence on social networks where you are consistently finding and sharing amazing content on your interests and expertise will keep your network aware of you and on their mind if something relevant comes their way.

You want your social network to know you as the “social media guru”, “HR expert”, “design master”, etc.  Sparks lets you do it rather simply.

Hangouts: Group Video

One of the challenges I’ve had at work has been online collaboration with our team that is spread between Arizona, Vancouver, and Ontario.  In the past we’ve used Skype to do some face to face video as long as it was just two of us, but now Google is offering the ability to use video chat as a group, with their new Hangouts feature.

If this works as easily as they show it, then I may be moving to a new way to do video calls.

Huddle: Group Texting

Sometimes a person’s preferred way to communicate is text.  However texting becomes difficult if what you need to talk about involves more than the person you are texting with.  What if you want Bob and Sally’s input in the conversation?

That’s what Google’s Huddle feature aims to accomplish.  It’s basically turning your text into an instant messaging device.  You can have a whole group of people in a text where each text is share with the group rather then the individual.

Related Posts:

 

Comments are closed.